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DHO Workshops: Text Encoding with the TEI

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Date: Wednesday 7th and Thursday 8th April 2010
Venue: Moore Institute, National University of Ireland Galway

In collaboration with:

Moore Institute  show on map

 

Note: Registration is required to participate in these workshops. Please register here registration button

 

The DHO in collaboration with the Moore Institute is pleased to offer a three-day series of workshops of interest to humanities scholars who would like to learn about text encoding, manuscript encoding and digital resources useful for Irish Studies.

'Text Encoding with the TEI' will offer two concurrent workshop strands in text encoding for both beginners and more advanced practitioners. These two-day courses will concentrate on the theories and practicalities of creating electronic scholarly editions utilising the Text Encoding Initiative Guidelines, the standard in the field.

You must be registered and logged into dho.ie to download the workshop materials.

 

Workshop A: From Text Encoding to Digital Publishing

Presenters: Dr Susan Schreibman (Digital Humanities Observatory) and Kevin S. Hawkins (Digital Humanities Observatory & University of Michigan)


In this workshop participants will learn about the markup of text, the Text Encoding Initiative (TEI) Guidelines, and tools that can be used to create, work with, and publish text. Particular attention will be paid to use of TEI encoding for publishing scholarly editions and other scholarly literature, both in digital and print form. The workshop will contain a mix of lectures of hands-on exercises with step-by-step instructions intended to familiarise participants with the basic techniques of creating an XML-encoded text

 

Workshop A Schedule:

 

Wednesday, 7th April

Moore Institute Seminar Room (203)

09:30 - 13:00:

1. Class introductions [slides]
2. Lecture: Introduction to XML [slides]
3. Lecture: Introduction to the Text Encoding Initiative [slides]
4. Exercise: Document analysis

14:00 - 17:30pm:

1. Exercise: Introductory TEI encoding 1
2. Lecture: Introduction to the TEI header [slides]

 

Thursday, 8th April

Moore Institute Seminar Room (203)

09:30 - 13:00:

1. Exercise: Introductory TEI encoding 2
2. Lecture: Why encode? [slides]
3. Lecture: Why not encode? [slides, handout]

14:00 - 17:30pm:

1. Lecture: Digital workflows [slides]
2. Exercise: Introductory TEI encoding 3
3. Lecture: How to publish your TEI documents [handout]

 

Reading List:

'Guidelines for Editors of Scholarly Editions' ( http://www.mla.org/cse_guidelines )

Cummings, James 'The Text Encoding Initiative and the Study of Literature' in A Companion to Digital Literary Studies, ed. Susan Schreibman and Ray Siemens. Oxford: Blackwell, 2008. ( http://www.digitalhumanities.org/companionDLS/ )

 

Workshop B: TEI for Handwritten Texts

Presenters: Dr Malte Rehbein & Dr Justin Tonra

 

This course will provide an introduction to the theory and practice of encoding and transforming handwritten materials, including classical, medieval, early modern, and modern texts. It is designed for individuals embarking on a text encoding project of non-print materials, and who would like a better understanding of the philosophy, theory, and practicalities of encoding in XML (Extensible Markup Language) using the Text Encoding Initiative (TEI) guidelines. Topics covered will depend on the participants' experiences and interests and may include:


  • Representing primary sources in encoding
  • Describing manuscripts and other text-bearing objects
  • Critical apparatus and variant readings
  • Linking between text and image, description and image, and text and description
  • Displaying, visualizing, and using encoded texts
  • Specification of own document encoding rules using schemas

Some existing knowledge of XML and the TEI would be of benefit.

 

Workshop B Schedule:

 

Wednesday, 7th April

Room AO208, Experimental Physics

09:30 - 13:00:

1. Class introductions
2. Representing primary sources in encoding

14:00 - 17:30:

1. Describing manuscripts and other text-bearing objects
2. Critical apparatus and variant readings

 

Thursday, 8th April

Room AO208, Experimental Physics
 
09:30 - 13:00:
 
1. Linking between text and image, description and image, and text and description
2. Displaying, visualizing, and using encoded texts
 
14:00 - 17:30:
 
1. Specification of own document encoding rules using schemas
2. Wrap-up session

 
Reading list:

TEI Chapters:

10. Manuscript Description
11. Representation of Primary Sources
12. Critical Apparatus

 
The above chapters can be found here
 
Attendees will need to bring a (wireless enabled) laptop to the above workshops to facilitate the Oxygen XML Editor. License keys will be e-mailed to those who have successfully registered in advance of the event.  
 
Workshop Facilitators:

Susan Schreibman

Susan Schreibman is the Director of the DHO. In 1997 she received her PhD from UCD for her doctoral thesis entitled: 'The Thomas MacGreevy Chronology: A Documentary Life, 1855-1934.' Subsequently she was awarded Newman Postdoctoral Fellowship (1997-2000) where she began The MacGreevy Archive. 
She is the principal developer of The Versioning Machine and is the founding editor of Irish Resources in the Humanities. Dr Schreibman is currently Vice Chair of the Text Encoding Initiative (TEI) and is Chair of the Modern Language Association's Committee on Information Technology. She is the author of Collected Poems of Thomas MacGreevy: An Annotated Edition (1991), co-editor of A Companion to Digital Humanities (Blackwell, 2004), and A Companion to Digital Literary Studies (Blackwell, 2008).

Kevin Hawkins

Kevin Hawkins is the Visiting Metadata Manager for the DHO, on leave from his position as Electronic Publishing Librarian at the University of Michigan. He serves on the Text Encoding Initiative (TEI) Council and co-convenes the TEI SIG on Libraries, and he brings to the DHO experience with metadata and document processing workflows. Kevin has BAs in Russian and linguistics from the University of Maryland and an MS in library and information science from the University of Illinois.  

Malte Rehbein

malte rehbeinMalte Rehbein is a graduate in both history and mathematics from the University of Göttingen with first working experience in the Digital Humanities and the TEI as student researcher at Max-Planck-Institute for History in Göttingen (1996-99). He is currently Marie Curie Research Fellow at the National University of Ireland, Galway and member of TEXTE (http://www.mooreinstitute.ie/projects.php?project=15), Transfer of Expertise in Technologies of Editing. As such, Malte is actively involved in a variety of projects using TEI P5 to create scholarly editions of different types of texts. He is also a member of the Institut für Dokumentologie und Editorik (http://www.i-d-e.de/).
Malte's most recent project is the digital edition of "kundige bok", a collection of late medieval legal texts and the dynamic linkage between the textual expression and the "external", contextual or semantic knowledge about the text. He is co-chair of the Manuscripts TEI Special Interest Group.
Website:
 http://denkstaette.de/cv_en.html.

 

Justin Tonra

Justin Tonra completed his PhD in English Literature at the National University of Ireland, Galway in 2009, where he also worked as part of the Thomas Moore Hypermedia Archive project <thomasmoore.ie>. As part of this project, he was editor of a pilot hypermedia edition of Thomas Moore's 1817 work, Lalla Rookh, focusing on tracing and visualising the evolution and development of the text of the poem through manuscript drafts to its eventual publication. His interests are in the areas of manuscript encoding, and examining the genetic processes of writing in literary texts. Justin holds an MA from University College Dublin and a BA from Trinity College Dublin.